Withdrawal Agreement Voted

Immediately after the announcement of a revised withdrawal agreement on October 17, 2019, Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the DUP said they could not support the new agreement. [30] A previous withdrawal agreement – reached between former Prime Minister Theresa May and the EU – has been rejected three times by MPs. After voting on the third vote and the approval of the Cooper-Letwin Act at third reading by 313-312, May and her cabinet considered the possibility of bringing the withdrawal agreement back to Parliament for a fourth vote. [114] In mid-May, May said she would present the withdrawal agreement to Parliament in the first week of June. [115] Due to massive opposition to the new agreement, May postponed publication from 24 May to 4 June and subsequently resigned as Prime Minister. [116] Following the success of Letwin`s first amendment, indicative votes were held on 27 March on the Brexit options favoured by Parliament. Eight proposals were voted on, eight of which failed. The withdrawal law, which aims to implement the Prime Minister`s Brexit deal with the EU in October, was presented in the Queen`s Speech on Thursday, which set out the government`s priorities for next year. The transitional period from 1 February expires at the end of December 2020. Any agreement on future relations between the EU and the UK must be concluded in full before that date, when it is due to come into force on 1 January 2021. On 15 January 2019, the House of Commons voted by 230 votes against the Brexit withdrawal agreement,[10] the largest vote against the British government. [31] The government may survived a vote of confidence the next day. [10] On March 12, 2019, the House of Commons voted 149 votes against the agreement, the fourth-biggest defeat of the government in the history of the House of Commons.

[32] A third vote on the Brexit withdrawal agreement, widely expected on 19 March 2019, was rejected by the House of Commons spokesman on 18 March 2019, on the basis of a parliamentary convention of 2 April 1604, which prevented British governments from forcing the House of Commons to vote several times on a subject already voted on by the House of Commons. [34] [35] [36] An abbreviated version of the withdrawal agreement, in which the annex political statement had been withdrawn, consisted of the test of “substantial amendments,” so that a third vote was held on 29 March 2019, but was rejected by 58 votes. [37] MPs voted at second reading on the government`s withdrawal agreement. With Boris Johnson`s 80-person majority, the bill was passed with a comfortable lead, with 358 votes and 234 against. In December 2017, pressure intensified on the government to amend Term 9 to allow Parliament to approve the final terms of the UK-EU withdrawal agreement by 29 March 2019, the date set for the UK`s withdrawal from the EU. Conservative MP Dominic Grieve advised the government to amend the clause itself or it would table its own amendment to the bill. [17] Grieve introduced its amendment to the Bill (Amendment 7) in which it stipulates that a Brexit agreement must be implemented by legislative and not by government decision. [18] On the weekend before the amendment was voted in the House of Commons, the chairs of the United Nations Group on Eu-Europe Relations signed a statement saying: “Members of all parties have already given valuable control to the EU withdrawal law and we have forced the government to make some concessions. But it won`t matter if we can`t really vote on the withdrawal agreement that the government is negotiating with the European Union. [20] [21] On 22 October 2019, the House of Commons agreed, by 329 votes to 299, to give a second reading to the revised withdrawal agreement (negotiated by Boris Johnson earlier this month), but when the accelerated timetable he had proposed did not receive the necessary parliamentary support, Johnson announced that the legislation would be on hold. [38] [12] After further negotiations between the United Kingdom