David Trimble Good Friday Agreement

David Trimble, the chairman of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) in Northern Ireland, has long been known for his relentless attitude towards Catholics. But just weeks after his party leader in 1995, he began discussions with his political opponents in search of compromise. Trimble sat down at the negotiating table with the Irish prime minister, former nemesis Sinn Fein and the British. In April 1998, he was one of the signatories of a peace agreement to which he convinced a majority of the UUP. The Good Friday Agreement resulted in increased autonomy for Northern Ireland, which ensured an appropriate level of influence for both population groups. The penal code would be reviewed, imprisoned terrorists would be released and illegal weapons would be destroyed. Disputes over the timing and extent of the IRA`s (disarmament) dismantling stalled the implementation of the Good Friday Agreement until Trimble, backed by IRA concessions, convinced the Ulster Unionist Council, the UUP`s governing body, to allow it to share power with Sinn Féin in 1999 and again in 2000. In July 2001, Trimble was briefly the first minister to resign and accused the IRA of failing to comply with its closure agreement. He remained Prime Minister until October 2002, when the Northern Ireland Assembly was suspended by the British government. One of them was the Catholic leader of the moderate Social Democratic and Labour Party, John Hume, considered by many to be the main architect of the peace agreement.

After joining the Northern Ireland civil rights movement in the late 1960s, he was convinced that nationalism was a diminishing force in the new Europe. It believes that Northern Ireland needs greater autonomy, with powers reasonably distributed among the people: better relations must be established between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as well as between London and Dublin. Hume devoted a lot of energy to involving IRA leader Gerry Adams and the British government in the negotiations. The Irish backstop elements of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement offer a varying degree of alignment between the UK and the European Union after Brexit, although it is not possible to reach a comprehensive agreement on their future relationship. . . .